Friday, 25 April 2014

Berlusconi: here's what he can do and what he can't do during his term as a social worker

Wednesday, 23 April 2014. As Mr Berlusconi signs Milan's Surveillance Court prescriptions' document regarding his term as a social worker, becomes clear to him what he is allowed to do and what he isn't.


Silvio Berlusconi will serve his sentence for tax fraud by helping in at Sacra Famiglia (Sacred Family) elderly people’s home in Cesano Boscone (east of Milan, about 25 miles away from his villa in Arcore), where he signed a documents detailing the term.


You choose the sentence for Silvio Berlusconi, a game by to The Guardian
There are 12 prescriptions in the document, and the former prime minister of Italy can't really complain, as the house arrest – which was one of the options on the table – would have involve more constrictions than his job as a social worker, 4 hours a week.


Here are the things the politician cannot do:

  • He must refrain from frequenting person with a criminal record, like Alessandro Sallusti, the director of Il Giornale, a newspaper owned by the Berlusconi Family, who wrote an article labelling as “state bandits” the judges that convicted Berlusconi;
  • He must avoid nocturnal outings (bunga-bunga parties included, unless the gatherings are held at his home);
  • He must not defame single judges (apparently he can keep on defaming the Judiciary of Italy as a whole, like saying they are worse than the Sicilian Mafia);
  • The Sureveillance Court 's press release
  • He cannot leave Lombardy (apart from trips to Rome), and he can definitely forget about going abroad.

Thinks Berlusconi can do:
  • He can travel to Rome, from Mondays to Thursdays, but can't come home late, he must be back by 11pm (and can't leave before 6am);
  • He might deliver public speeches (in Lombardy or in Rome, of course);
  • He can appear on TV (but not together with person holding a criminal record, which might be tricky enough);
  • He (allegedly) can keep on defaming Italian Judiciary, but up to a certain extent (and mustn't get to personal).

In the meanwhile – Berlusconi is positive about this – everybody will cotton on that it's all about a terrible misunderstanding, and things will get back to the good old days.